How did Nic Fink Break his Wrists

U.S. Olympic team member Nic Fink finished second in the 200-meter breaststroke final in a timing of 2 minutes, eight seconds (Thursday).

However, the 28-year-old Olympian has had some setbacks, including a double wrist injury last year. I’m curious as to what happened to cause Nic Fink to break his wrists.

How did Nic Fink Break his Wrists

Where did Nic Fink go?

An “old man’s stroke,” breaststroke is Nic Fink’s area of expertise as a competitive swimmer.

The 28-year-old just qualified for tomorrow’s 200-meter breaststroke final at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics (29 July). He had to take some time away from swimming because he had recovered from a double wrist injury.

Therefore, he either didn’t swim at all or swam in soft casts on his wrists for a good chunk of 2020.

We talked to Cali Condors’ breaststroker Nic Fink, who got off to a sluggish start in the ISL this year due to a double wrist injury. Fink walks us through the arduous “rehab” process of swimming with soft casts on both hands and getting back into the rhythm of racing once the casts were removed.

It all worked out, though, as Fink set new American marks in the 100 and 200 breast at the ISL Finale and finished in the top four in the breaststroke skins races to help Cali take home the league championship.

Although Nick Fink was not swimming when he sustained the injury last year, he discussed the circumstances surrounding the incident in a recent interview. “I was exercising out and I fell,” he said. During that time, he was in the United States. Instead of saying, “I rolled over on my wrist,” he said.

Nick Fink’s training has been substantially slowed due to an injury to both of his wrists, though it is not known if he actually shattered either of them.

The fact that Nick Fink has been able to race again and lead his team to an overall victory suggests that the wrist injury he suffered around six months ago has healed.

Last Words

New Jersey native Fink, who followed his older sister into the water by a year, said, “Experience goes a long way in the breaststroke.”

He admitted that he was a late bloomer who didn’t reach his full potential until his senior year at the University of Georgia, where he placed second in the country in the 100-meter dash and fourth in the 200-meter dash.