K. Cordón Olympic Games Tokyo 2020

K. Cordón’s outstanding performance at the Olympic Games has paid dividends in the shape of a high-profile job offer and, as of today, news that he has received his fourth degree. Tokyo, Japan, Olympic badminton court, year 2020. A real chilihead, that one!

To refresh your memory, on the main court at the Musashino Forest Sports Square, La Unión’s Zacapa squared up against Indonesia’s Anthony Ginting in a game for the bronze medal.

K. Cordón Olympic Games Tokyo 2020

K. Cordón Olympic Games Tokyo 2020

K. Cordón was the first player from the Americas to compete for an Olympic medal, and his performance in Tokyo put him in the company of the world’s top four badminton players.

He posted his graduation day excitement on social media with the message, “We already have it.” The equivalent of a fourth year of school. The 2020 Summer Olympics will include badminton for the first time.

He had a great showing in Japan’s capital, winning four times total. Only two of them made it past the group stage, while the rest progressed to the eighth and final rounds. A role in history was made, and every Guatemalan will never forget being a part of this event.

When it came to the men’s individual badminton competition at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, K. Cordón was Guatemala’s big surprise. His historic competition ended today, Monday, August 2, when he lost the bronze medal match against Indonesia’s Anthony Sinisuka Gintings by a score of 2-0.

The Guatemalan put up a good fight in Musashino Forest Sports Square, but ultimately lost to Ginting, bronze medalist from the 2014 Nanking Youth Olympics. After 38 minutes, K. Cordón finally gave in, and the Indonesian clinched a podium finish with scores of 21-11 and 21-13.

K. Cordón is making headlines for all the right reasons: he’s the first Latin American badminton player to reach a bronze medal match.

There could not have been a better start for K. Cordón in the first two games of the group stage. On Monday, July 26th, the Guatemalan made his debut against the Mexican Linen Muoz, whom he promptly dispatched in straight sets (2-0) in just 42 minutes.

And then, just two days later, it happened again, this time against the Hong Kong player NG Ka Long: another 42 minutes of play, another 2-0 loss for Cordón.

Last Words

K. Cordón tolerated Ginting in a game that they started playing long but ended up taking him to the network, a position that cost the Guatemalan more; he came close on the scoreboard in the second set, but missed several opportunities that gave him a hard lead to beat the Indonesian, who hung up the valuable medal.